New Zealand passport

$3,000.00

Visa requirements

As of 26 March 2019, New Zealand citizens had visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 181 countries and territories around the world, including all European Union member states, ranking the New Zealand passport 9th in the world in terms of travel freedom (tied with Australian and Icelandic passport) according to the Henley Passport Index. Additionally, Arton Capital’s Passport Index ranked the New Zealand passport 6th in the world in terms of travel freedom, with a visa-free score of 162 (tied with Icelandic and Maltese passports), as of 2 December 2018.

Eligibility requirements: New Zealand citizens and non citizens
Expiration: Age at date of Application: 15-: 5 Years from Date of Issue 16+: 10 Years from Date of Issue
Purpose: Identification

Description

New Zealand passport

New Zealand passports (in Māori: Uruwhenua Aotearoa) are issued to New Zealand citizens for the purpose of international travel by the Department of Internal Affairs. New Zealand has a passport possession rate of around 70% of the population and there are around 2.9 million New Zealand passports in circulation. It is ranked as one of the most powerful passports in the world

Application procedure

The Department of Internal Affairs is responsible for issuing New Zealand passports. The Department of Internal Affairs issues passports from its offices in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington in New Zealand, as well as overseas offices in Sydney and London. New Zealand embassies, High Commissions and consulates outside of Sydney and London are not able to issue passports, although diplomatic officers may be able to provide application forms and assist in communicating with an issuing office.

Adult passports now can be applied through online for both first time and renewals. Processing time is 10 working days plus delivery, unless an urgent or call-out service is requested. There are online fees for Australia and the UK as well as New Zealand.

Urgent travel

In emergencies, some New Zealand embassies, High Commissions and consulates may be able to issue an Emergency Travel Document with a validity of only one year intended to assist New Zealand citizens who do not have the time to obtain a passport in time to travel. In countries where there is no New Zealand diplomatic post, New Zealand citizens who need to travel urgently and whose passport has expired, been lost or been stolen can be issued with an Emergency Travel Document at a cost of £95 by a British foreign mission as long as this has been cleared with the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
Endorsement indicating New Zealand citizenship

As an alternative to obtaining a New Zealand passport, New Zealand citizens with another nationality and a foreign passport/travel document can apply for an endorsement indicating New Zealand citizenship from Immigration New Zealand (INZ). The endorsement can either be physically affixed inside the foreign passport/travel document or can be electronically linked in INZ’s database to the foreign passport/travel document. An endorsement indicating New Zealand citizenship is valid for the duration of the foreign passport/travel document it is endorsed in or electronically linked to.  The fee for the endorsement is completely waived if electronically linked to or affixed inside a passport issued by Austria, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Israel, Italy or Turkey. Given that the maximum validity of New Zealand passports is 10 years for adults and 5 years for under 16 year old, an endorsement indicating New Zealand citizenship may work out to be an even more economic option if affixed inside or linked electronically to a foreign passport/travel document which has a longer validity (e.g. 10 years). It is also easier to obtain an endorsement indicating New Zealand citizenship than a New Zealand passport overseas, since an endorsement can be issued at INZ offices in Apia, Bangkok, Beijing, Ho Chi Minh City, Hong Kong, Jakarta, London, Moscow, Mumbai, New Delhi, Nuku’alofa, Pretoria, Shanghai, Singapore, Suva, Sydney and Taipei, whilst New Zealand passports are only issued overseas by the Department of Internal Affairs in Sydney and London. However, New Zealand citizens with dual/multiple nationality travelling on a passport/travel document issued by another country may be unable to access New Zealand consular assistance whilst overseas and may not be able to enjoy as many visa exemptions. For example, a dual New Zealand and Samoan citizen travelling only on a Samoan passport with an endorsement indicating New Zealand citizenship affixed inside is unable to obtain a Special Category Visa (SCV) upon arrival in Australia and must obtain an Australian visitor visa before travelling, since to obtain an SCV a New Zealand citizen must present a valid New Zealand passport.

Return travel to New Zealand without a passport

In general, to establish his/her right to enter New Zealand, a New Zealand citizen is required to present a valid New Zealand passport or a passport issued by another country that is electronically linked or physically affixed with an endorsement indicating New Zealand citizenship.

However, a New Zealand embassy, high commission or consulate or an Immigration New Zealand branch can request that the immigration officer at a port of entry in New Zealand not demand to see a passport of a New Zealand citizen in urgent or compassionate circumstances (e.g. death or serious illness) where there is not enough time for a New Zealand passport to be issued.

Physical appearance

Cover

The current version of New Zealand passports issued since November 2009 are black, with the New Zealand coat of arms emblazoned in silver in the centre of the front cover. The words “NEW ZEALAND PASSPORT” and “URUWHENUA AOTEAROA” are inscribed above the coat of arms in silver. The standard biometric symbol appears at the bottom of the front cover. Both the front and back covers have silver ferns embossed on the outside edge.

Regular passports issued prior to November 2009 had a navy blue cover.
Passport note

Passports contain a note from the issuing state that is addressed to the authorities of all other states, identifying the bearer as a citizen of that state and requesting that he or she be allowed to pass and be treated according to international norms. The note inside New Zealand passports states:

The Governor-General in the Realm of New Zealand requests in the Name of Her Majesty The Queen all whom it may concern to allow the holder to pass without delay or hindrance and in case of need to give all lawful assistance and protection.

and in Māori:

He tono tēnei nā te Kāwana-Tianara O te Whenua o Aotearoa i raro i te Ingoa o Kuini Erihāpeti ki te hunga e tika ana kia kaua e akutōtia, e whakakōpekatia te tangata mau i te uruwhenua nei i ana haere, ā, i te wā e hiahiatia ai me āwhina, me manaaki.

Languages

The textual portions of New Zealand passports are printed in both English and Māori. (Previously English and French.)

Bio-data page
The bio-data page of the current version of the New Zealand passport includes the following data:

Photo of the passport holder (in black and white)
Type (Momo): P
Issuing state (Whenua): NZL
Passport No. (Tau Uruwhenua)
Surname (Ingoa whānau)
Given names (Ingoa āke)
Nationality (Iwi tūturu): NEW ZEALAND
Date of birth (Rā whānau)
Sex (Tāne-Wahine)
Place of birth (Wāhi whānau) (Passports issued after December 2005 will only include the city of birth)
Date of issue (Rā timatanga)
Date of expiry (Rā mutunga)
Authority (Te Mana Tuku)

The information page ends with the Machine Readable Zone.
Law

Under the Passports Act 1992, the Minister of Internal Affairs has the power to refuse a passport, for example, on grounds of national security.

The Minister also has the discretion to issue a passport for less than the current ten-year validity period.
Incidents

Use by Israeli government

In 2004, two Israelis, suspected agents working for Mossad, Eli Cara and Uriel Kelman, were convicted and jailed for attempting to obtain New Zealand passports by submitting fraudulent applications. A third suspected Mossad agent, Zev William Barkan, who was a former Israeli diplomat based in Europe was involved in stealing the identity of a tetraplegic Auckland resident to obtain a passport fraudulently in his name. It was not until a year later that the Israeli government formally apologised to the New Zealand government for the actions of its citizens.

In the immediate aftermath of the 2011 Christchurch earthquake, concerns were raised that a group of Israelis may have again been attempting to fraudulently obtain New Zealand passports, but scant evidence of this has been found to-date.

After Ofer Mizrahi, an Israeli national, died after being crushed by falling masonry in a parked van, he was found in possession of more than one foreign passport and the New Zealand government investigated whether he and his companions had links to Mossad. There were concerns that the travellers may have been trying to infiltrate the police national computer system to gain access to information which could be used to clone New Zealand passports.

His surviving travelling companions, Michal Fraidman, Liron Sade and Guy Jordan, met with Israeli officials and left New Zealand within twelve hours of the earthquake. After investigations by the police and SIS, Prime Minister Key said that they found Mossad was not involved, and that: “There is, in the view of those agencies, no link between those individuals and Israeli intelligence agencies. There was no evidence found to suggest there were anything other than backpackers”.

Visa requirements

As of 26 March 2019, New Zealand citizens had visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 181 countries and territories around the world, including all European Union member states, ranking the New Zealand passport 9th in the world in terms of travel freedom (tied with Australian and Icelandic passport) according to the Henley Passport Index. Additionally, Arton Capital’s Passport Index ranked the New Zealand passport 6th in the world in terms of travel freedom, with a visa-free score of 162 (tied with Icelandic and Maltese passports), as of 2 December 2018.

 

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