Selected:

British Passport

$3,000.00

British Passport

(1 customer review)

$3,000.00

Visa requirements

Visa requirements for British citizens are administrative entry restrictions by the authorities of other states placed on citizens of the United Kingdom. As of 26 March 2019, holders of regular British Citizen passports had visa-free or visa on arrival access to 185 countries and territories, ranking the British Citizen passport 5th in the world in terms of travel freedom (tied with Austrian, Dutch, Norwegian, Portuguese and Swiss passports). Additionally, Arton Capital’s Passport Index ranked the British Citizen passport 3rd in the world in terms of travel freedom, with a visa-free score of 163 (tied with Austrian, Belgian, Canadian, Greek, Irish, Japanese, Portuguese and Swiss passports), as of 17 October 2018.

Eligibility requirements:

British and non British citizenship or any of the various other forms of British nationality

Non citizens are required to have a obtain a new birth certificate

Expiration:
10 years (16 or older); 5 years (under 16)

Purpose:
Identification

Description

British passport

British passports are passports issued by the United Kingdom to those holding any form of British nationality. There are different types of British nationality, and different types of British passports as a result. A British passport enables the bearer to travel worldwide and serves as proof of citizenship. Every British citizen is also a citizen of the European Union. The passport allows for freedom of movement in any of the states of the European Economic Area and Switzerland. It also facilitates access to consular assistance from British embassies around the world, or any embassy of another European Union member state until the United Kingdom departs the European Union in October 2019. Passports are issued using royal prerogative, which is exercised by Her Majesty’s Government.

British citizen passports have been issued in the UK by Her Majesty’s Passport Office since 2006, a division of the Home Office. British citizens can use their passport as evidence of right of abode in the United Kingdom and EU citizenship. All passports issued in the UK since 2006 have been biometric.

In 1988, the UK government changed the colour of the passport to burgundy red from dark blue, in line with most EU passports. In response to Brexit, the UK government announced in December 2017 its plan to change the passport colour back to dark blue from October 2019. New passports were issued from 30 March 2019 that removed all references to the European Union as part of the Brexit planning by the Home Office.

Visa requirements

Visa requirements for British citizens are administrative entry restrictions by the authorities of other states placed on citizens of the United Kingdom. As of 26 March 2019, holders of regular British Citizen passports had visa-free or visa on arrival access to 185 countries and territories, ranking the British Citizen passport 5th in the world in terms of travel freedom (tied with Austrian, Dutch, Norwegian, Portuguese and Swiss passports). Additionally, Arton Capital’s Passport Index ranked the British Citizen passport 3rd in the world in terms of travel freedom, with a visa-free score of 163 (tied with Austrian, Belgian, Canadian, Greek, Irish, Japanese, Portuguese and Swiss passports), as of 17 October 2018.

Types of British passports

Owing to the many different categories in British nationality law, there are different types of passports for each class of British nationality. All categories of British passports are issued by Her Majesty’s Government under royal prerogative. Since all British passports are issued in the name of the Crown, the reigning monarch does not require a passport.The following table shows the number of valid British passports on the last day of 2018 and shows the different categories eligible to hold a British passport:

CATEGORY COUNTRY CODE VALID PASSPORTS
AS AT 31 DEC 2019 ISSUING AUTHORITY NOTE
British citizens GBR 50,437,362 In the UK: HM Passport Office (HMPO)
In Gibraltar: Civil Status and Registration Office (CSRO)
British Overseas Territories Citizens of Gibraltar GBD 2,305 CSRO formerly British Dependent Territories Citizens
British Overseas Territories Citizens of other British Overseas Territories 45,171 HMPO on behalf of individual Overseas Territories[8]
British Overseas citizens GBO 12,656 HMPO
British subjects with right of abode in UK GBS 33,669 HMPO
British subjects without right of abode in UK 829 HMPO
British protected persons GBP 1,321 HMPO
British Nationals (Overseas) GBN 169,653 HMPO

Physical appearance

British passports are burgundy, with the coat of arms of the United Kingdom emblazoned in the centre of the front cover.

With the sole exception of emergency passports, which are printed and issued by British diplomatic missions, all other types of British passports have been printed and issued by Her Majesty’s Passport Office (HMPO) in the United Kingdom since May 2015. Some British Overseas Territories, such as Bermuda, did not start forwarding applications to HMPO until June 2016 when their own passport book stock was depleted.

There are three types of covers among British passports. Passports with the generic cover are issued to British citizens not residing in the Crown dependencies and Gibraltar, and persons holding all other types of British nationality. Passports issued to residents of the Crown dependencies and Gibraltar have a slightly variated cover. Passports issued to British Overseas Territories citizens residing in certain territories have a completely different cover, albeit with the same interior design.

Generic design

Front cover

The words “UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND” are inscribed above the coat of arms, whilst the word “PASSPORT” is inscribed below. The biometric passport symbol EPassport logo.svg appears at the bottom of the front cover under the word “PASSPORT”.

Until 30 March 2019 the words “EUROPEAN UNION” were printed at the top of British passports issued to British nationals who are considered “United Kingdom nationals for European Community purposes(i.e. British Citizens, British Subjects with the right of abode in the UK and British Overseas Territories Citizens connected with Gibraltar). It is not included at the top of other British passports (i.e. passports issued to British Nationals (Overseas), British Overseas Citizens, British Protected Persons, non-Gibraltarian British Overseas Territories Citizens and British Subjects without the right of abode in the UK)

Passport note

Generic British passports contain on their inside cover the following words in English only:

Her Britannic Majesty’s Secretary of State Requests and requires in the Name of Her Majesty all those whom it may concern to allow the bearer to pass freely without let or hindrance, and to afford the bearer such assistance and protection as may be necessary.

In older passports, more specific reference was made to “Her Britannic Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs”, originally including the name of the incumbent.
Information page

British passports issued by HM Passport Office include the following data on the information page:

Photograph of the owner/holder (digital image printed on page)
Type (P)
Code of issuing state (GBR)
Passport number
Surname (see note below regarding titles)
Given names
Nationality (the class of British nationality, such as “British Citizen” or “British Overseas Citizen”, or if issued on behalf of a Commonwealth country, “Commonwealth Citizen”
Date of birth
Sex (Gender)
Place of birth (only the city or town is listed, even if born outside the UK; places of birth in Wales are entered in Welsh upon request
Date of issue
Authority
Date of expiry
Machine Readable Zone starting with P<GBR

The items are identified by text in English and French (e.g., “Date of birth/Date de naissance”); there is a section in which all this text is translated into Welsh and Scottish Gaelic. Passports issued until March 2019 were translated into all official EU languages.

According to the UK government, the current policy of using titles on passports requires that the applicant provides evidence that the Lord Lyon has recognised a feudal barony, or the title is included in Burke’s Peerage. If accepted (and if the applicant wishes to include the title), the correct form is for the applicant to include the territorial designation as part of their surname (Surname of territorial designation e.g. Smith of Inverglen). The Observation would then show the holder’s full name, followed by their feudal title e.g. The holder is John Smith, Baron of Inverglen.

Function-related passports

Besides the ordinary passports described above, special passports are issued to government officials from which diplomatic status may (diplomatic passport) or may not (official passport) be conferred by the text on the cover. A special passport is available for the Queen’s Messenger. The latter passport contains the text QUEEN’S MESSENGER – COURRIER DIPLOMATIQUE below the coat of arms, and the text “BRITISH PASSPORT” above it.

Passports issued to residents of certain British Overseas Territories

See also: British passport (Anguilla), British passport (Bermuda), British passport (British Virgin Islands), British passport (Cayman Islands), British passport (Montserrat), British passport (Saint Helena), and British passport (Turks and Caicos Islands)

Traditionally, British passports issued to BOTCs residing in certain British Overseas Territories (Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Montserrat, St. Helena, and Turks & Caicos Islands) bear a different design, even when the HMPO assumed the responsibility of the manufacturing process of these passports in 2015.

Passports issued to BOTCs of those territories bear the words “BRITISH PASSPORT” above the royal coat of arms of Queen Elizabeth II and the name of the British Overseas Territory below it (e.g. “TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS”). The only exception is the design of Bermudian passports, which bears the wordings “GOVERNMENT OF BERMUDA” under the royal coat of arms.

The nationality reads “British Overseas Territories citizen” regardless of the residence of the bearer. Previously, in the machine-readable zone, the three-letter ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 code of the territory is given in the field of the code of issuing state, while GBD (British Overseas Territories citizens, formerly British Dependent Territories citizens) is shown in the nationality field. Either of these features enabled automatic distinction between BOTCs related to different territories. Ever since the HMPO assumed the responsibility of the issuance of BOTC passports in 2015, however, the code of issuing state is changed to GBD for all territories, thus making it impossible to identify the holder’s domicile without the aid of other features, such as the passport cover.

Similar to passports issued to Crown dependencies and Gibraltar residents, the passport note request is made by the Governor of the British Overseas Territory on behalf of “Her Majesty’s Secretary of State”.

Multiple passports
People who have valid reasons may be allowed to hold more than one passport booklet. This applies usually to people who travel frequently on business, and may need to have a passport booklet to travel on while the other is awaiting a visa for another country. Some Muslim-majority countries including Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, and Yemen do not issue visas to visitors if their passports bear a stamp or visa issued by Israel, as a result of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. In that case, a person can apply for a second passport to avoid travel issues. Reasons and supporting documentation (such as a letter from an employer) must be provided.

In addition, a person who has dual British citizenship and British Overseas Territories citizenship are allowed to hold two British passports under different statuses at the same time. Persons who acquired their BOTC status with a connection to Gibraltar or Falkland Islands, however, are not eligible due to differences in regulations, and their BOTC passports will be cancelled when their British citizen passports are issued even when they possess both citizenship.

Observations

Certain British passports are issued with printed endorsements on the Official Observations page, usually in upper case (capital letters). They form part of the passport when it is issued, as distinct from immigration stamps subsequently entered in the visa pages. Some examples are:

The Holder is not entitled to benefit from European Union provisions relating to employment or establishment

British citizens from Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man without a qualifying connection to the United Kingdom by descent or residency for more than five years have this endorsement in their passports. Moreover, British Nationals (Overseas) would have the same endorsement if they renew their BN(O) passport after 29 March 2019.

The Holder of this passport has Hong Kong permanent identity card no XXXXXXXX which states that the holder has the right of abode in Hong Kong

British Nationals (Overseas) (BN(O)s) have this endorsement in their passports, as registration as a BN(O) before 1997 required the applicant to hold a valid Hong Kong permanent identity card, which guaranteed the holder’s right of abode in Hong Kong. Such persons would continue to have right of abode or right to land in Hong Kong after the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong in 1997 under the Immigration Ordinance. This endorsement is also found in a British citizen passport when the holder has both British citizenship and BN(O) status.

The Holder is entitled to right of abode in the United Kingdom

British Subjects with the right of abode (usually from Ireland) have this endorsement in their passports.

The Holder is entitled to readmission in the United Kingdom

British Overseas Citizens who have been granted indefinite leave to enter or remain after 1968 retain this entitlement for life as their ILR is not subject to the two-year expiration rule, and their passports are accordingly issued with this endorsement.

The Holder is subject to control under the Immigration Act 1971

British nationals without the right of abode in the UK will have this endorsements in their passports unless they have been granted indefinite leave to enter or remain. However, even though a BN(O) passport does not entitle the holder the right of abode in the UK, this endorsement is not found in BN(O) passports (1999 and biometric versions).

In accordance with the United Kingdom immigration rules the holder of this passport does not require an entry certificate or visa to visit the United Kingdom

This endorsement is found in BN(O) passports, and accordingly holders of BN(O) passports are allowed to enter the UK as a visitor without an entry certificate or visa for up to six months per entry.

The Holder is also a British National (Overseas)

British citizens who also possess BN(O) status will have this endorsement in their passports to signify their additional status, as the two passports cannot be held at the same time.

The Holder is or The Holder is also known as …

This endorsement is found in passports where the holder uses or retains another professional, stage or religious name and is known by it “for all purposes”, or has a recognised form of address, academic, feudal or legal title (e.g. Doctor, Judge, Queen’s Counsel, Professor, Minister of Religion) regarded as important identifiers of an individual. The styling ‘Dr …’, ‘Professor …’ or similar is recorded here, or the alternative professional/stage/religious name, usually on request by the passport holder. For example, Cliff Richard’s birth name was Harry Webb, and the passport Observations page would read:

“The Holder is also known as Cliff Richard

This endorsement is also found in the passport of persons with Peerage titles, members of the Privy Council, holders of knighthoods and other decorations, etc, to declare the holder’s title.

Also, this endorsement is found if the passport holder’s name is too long to fit within the 30-character limits (including spaces) on the passport information page; applies to each line reserved for the surname and the first given name including any middle name(s). In this scenario the holder’s full name will be written out in full on the Observations page. According to the UK passport agency guidelines, a person with a long or multiple given name, which cannot fit within the 30-character passport information page limits, should enter as much of the first given name, followed by the initials of all middle names (if any). The same advice applies to a long or multiple surname. The holder’s full name is then shown printed out in its entirety on the passport Observations page. For example, Kiefer Sutherland’s birth name would read on the passport information page:

Surname: “Sutherland”
Given names: “Kiefer W F D G R”

Observations page:

“The Holder is Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland”

The holder’s name in Chinese Commercial Code: XXXX XXXX XXXX

This endorsement was found in BN(O)[citation needed] and Hong Kong British Dependent Territories Citizen passports held by BN(O)s and British Dependent Territories Citizens with a connection to Hong Kong who have a Chinese name recognised by the Hong Kong Immigration Department before the handover. After the handover, British passport issued in Hong Kong can only be issued at the British Consulate-General, and this endorsement is no longer in use. (See also: Chinese commercial code)

Holder is a dependent of a member of Her Britannic Majesty’s Diplomatic Service

This endorsement is found in British passports held by people who are dependents or spouses of British diplomats.

Monarch

The Queen, Elizabeth II, does not have a passport because passports are issued in her name and on her authority, thus making it superfluous for her to hold one. All other members of the royal family, however, including the Queen’s husband Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and their son, heir apparent Charles, Prince of Wales, do have passports.

1 review for British Passport

  1. Nicolas Lecocq

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer nec odio. Praesent libero. Sed cursus ante dapibus diam. Sed nisi. Nulla quis sem at nibh elementum imperdiet.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

WhatsApp chat
×
×

Cart